Research Summary

Mentoring Relationships and the Mental Health of Aboriginal Youth in Canada

2017

Mentoring Relationships and the Mental Health of Aboriginal Youth in Canada

5 months ago 5 months ago Published by
This research summary was developed by Pathways to Education.

HERE’S HOW THE AUTHORS DESCRIBE THIS RESEARCH SUMMARY:

Formal youth mentoring programs have a positive impact on young people’s wellbeing. However, little is known about their impact on Aboriginal youth. Using data from a Canada-wide survey of Big Brothers Big Sisters community mentoring programs, this study compares Aboriginal (i.e. First Nations, Inuit, or Métis) youth with non-Aboriginal youth before being matched with a mentor, and 18 months later. The objectives of this study were to assess: a) the mentoring relationship experiences of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal youth, and b) the impact of mentoring on the behavioural, psychological, and social functioning of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal youth. Results show that mentored Aboriginal youth reported fewer emotional problems and less social anxiety relative to non-mentored Aboriginal youth. These effects were not found among non-Aboriginal youth. This study offers insights for youth mentoring researchers and directors of mentoring programs supporting Aboriginal youth, particularly regarding programming implications.

Pathways to Education. (2017). Mentoring Relationships and the Mental Health of Aboriginal Youth in Canada. Toronto, ON: Author.

Categorised in: